WEFOUNDThe Private Life of Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur De Bienville: I. A Colonial Letter; II. Reminiscences; III. The Mississippi Bubble; IV. In the Paris ... French Will; Vi; Montmartre (Classic Reprint)


James Jean, known amongst us folk mostly for his comics cover work for Marvel and DC Comics, gave an interview earlier this year to Juxtapoz magazine, headlined about his dilemmas over being regarded as a fine artist or an illustrator. But he also took the opportunity to lay out his troubles of late…

The fact is I’ve been neutered by a divorce that has lasted for years. It has no foreseeable end because the respondent is incapable of settling, and I’ve run out of money to take it to court for a final decision. I’ve come to experience the absurdity of the law, and to be fooled by the fiction of justice.

I never made art for those reasons, but since it has been converted into a commodity, it has given nourishment to a great cancer in my life that has metastasized and consumed everything that I have diligently nurtured and saved the past ten years. The only cure is to destroy what has fed this insatiable mutation.

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ON A WEDNESDAY MORNING, the jet-setting multimillionaire entrepreneur and photographer Jean Pigozzi is having a side of outrage with his breakfast. In Silicon Valley to film a segment for his new show on the Esquire Network—My Friends Call Me Johnny, which follows the 62-year-old on his glitzy international adventures—he's stumbled across a personally offensive bit of tech news on his iPad Mini.

James Jean, known amongst us folk mostly for his comics cover work for Marvel and DC Comics, gave an interview earlier this year to Juxtapoz magazine, headlined about his dilemmas over being regarded as a fine artist or an illustrator. But he also took the opportunity to lay out his troubles of late…

The fact is I’ve been neutered by a divorce that has lasted for years. It has no foreseeable end because the respondent is incapable of settling, and I’ve run out of money to take it to court for a final decision. I’ve come to experience the absurdity of the law, and to be fooled by the fiction of justice.

I never made art for those reasons, but since it has been converted into a commodity, it has given nourishment to a great cancer in my life that has metastasized and consumed everything that I have diligently nurtured and saved the past ten years. The only cure is to destroy what has fed this insatiable mutation.

James Jean, known amongst us folk mostly for his comics cover work for Marvel and DC Comics, gave an interview earlier this year to Juxtapoz magazine, headlined about his dilemmas over being regarded as a fine artist or an illustrator. But he also took the opportunity to lay out his troubles of late…

The fact is I’ve been neutered by a divorce that has lasted for years. It has no foreseeable end because the respondent is incapable of settling, and I’ve run out of money to take it to court for a final decision. I’ve come to experience the absurdity of the law, and to be fooled by the fiction of justice.

I never made art for those reasons, but since it has been converted into a commodity, it has given nourishment to a great cancer in my life that has metastasized and consumed everything that I have diligently nurtured and saved the past ten years. The only cure is to destroy what has fed this insatiable mutation.

We use cookies and browser capability checks to help us deliver our online services, including to learn if you enabled Flash for video or ad blocking. By using our website or by closing this message box, you agree to our use of browser capability checks, and to our use of cookies as described in our Cookie Policy .

ON A WEDNESDAY MORNING, the jet-setting multimillionaire entrepreneur and photographer Jean Pigozzi is having a side of outrage with his breakfast. In Silicon Valley to film a segment for his new show on the Esquire Network—My Friends Call Me Johnny, which follows the 62-year-old on his glitzy international adventures—he's stumbled across a personally offensive bit of tech news on his iPad Mini.

Monnet was born in Cognac , a commune in the department of Charente in France, into a family of cognac merchants. At the age of sixteen, he abandoned his university entrance examinations part way through and moved to the United Kingdom , where he spent several years in London with Mr. Chaplin, an agent of his father's company. Subsequently, he traveled widely – to Scandinavia , Russia , Egypt , Canada , and the United States – for the family business.

At the Paris Peace Conference , Monnet was an assistant to the French minister of commerce and industry, Etienne Clémentel, who proposed a "new economic order" based on European cooperation. The scheme was officially rejected by the Allies in April 1919. [3]

Due to his contributions to the war effort, Monnet, at the age of thirty-one, was named Deputy Secretary General of the League of Nations by French premier Georges Clemenceau and British statesman Arthur Balfour , upon the League's creation in 1919.

James Jean, known amongst us folk mostly for his comics cover work for Marvel and DC Comics, gave an interview earlier this year to Juxtapoz magazine, headlined about his dilemmas over being regarded as a fine artist or an illustrator. But he also took the opportunity to lay out his troubles of late…

The fact is I’ve been neutered by a divorce that has lasted for years. It has no foreseeable end because the respondent is incapable of settling, and I’ve run out of money to take it to court for a final decision. I’ve come to experience the absurdity of the law, and to be fooled by the fiction of justice.

I never made art for those reasons, but since it has been converted into a commodity, it has given nourishment to a great cancer in my life that has metastasized and consumed everything that I have diligently nurtured and saved the past ten years. The only cure is to destroy what has fed this insatiable mutation.

We use cookies and browser capability checks to help us deliver our online services, including to learn if you enabled Flash for video or ad blocking. By using our website or by closing this message box, you agree to our use of browser capability checks, and to our use of cookies as described in our Cookie Policy .

ON A WEDNESDAY MORNING, the jet-setting multimillionaire entrepreneur and photographer Jean Pigozzi is having a side of outrage with his breakfast. In Silicon Valley to film a segment for his new show on the Esquire Network—My Friends Call Me Johnny, which follows the 62-year-old on his glitzy international adventures—he's stumbled across a personally offensive bit of tech news on his iPad Mini.

Monnet was born in Cognac , a commune in the department of Charente in France, into a family of cognac merchants. At the age of sixteen, he abandoned his university entrance examinations part way through and moved to the United Kingdom , where he spent several years in London with Mr. Chaplin, an agent of his father's company. Subsequently, he traveled widely – to Scandinavia , Russia , Egypt , Canada , and the United States – for the family business.

At the Paris Peace Conference , Monnet was an assistant to the French minister of commerce and industry, Etienne Clémentel, who proposed a "new economic order" based on European cooperation. The scheme was officially rejected by the Allies in April 1919. [3]

Due to his contributions to the war effort, Monnet, at the age of thirty-one, was named Deputy Secretary General of the League of Nations by French premier Georges Clemenceau and British statesman Arthur Balfour , upon the League's creation in 1919.

Reflecting on the life and work of the political philosopher Jean Bethke Elshtain, who died last month, Kathleen B Jones writes of a  friendship and thirty-year collegial exchange of ideas on subjects including just war, same sex marriage, and the limits of politics.

Political philosopher Jean Bethke Elshtain died on August 11, 2013 in Nashville, Tennessee at the age of 72. A controversial public intellectual and prolific scholar whose works covered the gamut from defending the role of religion in politics to providing justifications for war and engaging controversies about and within feminism, Jean Elshtain defied easy categorization either as a thinker or as a person.

As I wrote in my review, “using the ‘prism of the public and private,’” Jean offered “a provocative account of the tradition of Western thinking, including contemporary feminist social theories” and attempted to describe “an alternative ‘reflective feminist discourse’ based on a ‘reconstructive ideal of public and private.’” Although there had been many analyses of the tradition of Western theory, what distinguished Jean’s was the comprehensiveness of her review, in particular its inclusion of the work of radical, liberal, Marxist and psychoanalytic feminist theorists.


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